Build number always shows as #???

I'm using SVN for source control & I've set the build number format to "1..{build.number.vcs.1}" but every build comes up with the build number #???.

It's checking out ok and building fine.

Message was edited by:
Glenn Slaven

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Glenn,

You should use pattern build.vcs.number.1 instead of build.number.vcs.1.
I'll correct the docs.

Hope this helps,

KIR

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On Thu, 29 Mar 2007 10:39:00 -0300, Kirill Maximov (JetBrains)
<no_reply@jetbrains.com> wrote:

Glenn,

>

You should use pattern build.vcs.number.1 instead of
build.number.vcs.1.
I'll correct the docs.

>

Hope this helps,

>

KIR


The number that shows in the build if I use that pattern is the revision
of one of my external references (or at least it coincides with one of
them), not the revision of the root repository.

Regards,
Pablo

--

A threat is basically a means for establishing a bargaining position
by inducing fear in the subject. When a threat is used, it should
always be implied that the subject himself is to blame by using words
such as "You leave me no other choice but to..." He should never be
told to comply "or else!"
-- CIA 'Human Resources' Manual, for Latin America, , 1997

Pablo Montilla
www.odyssey.com.uy

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Pablo,

If you're using several VCS roots you may need to specify build.vcs.number.2
Or I can't catch exactly what do you mean by "external reference"

Kind regards,
KIR

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On Thu, 29 Mar 2007 17:28:10 -0300, Kirill Maximov (JetBrains)
<no_reply@jetbrains.com> wrote:

Pablo,
If you're using several VCS roots you may need to specify
build.vcs.number.2
Or I can't catch exactly what do you mean by "external reference"

>

Kind regards,
KIR

I'm using a single vcs root, a SVN root, that has an svn:externals
property that references other repositories...The revision number should
be that of the root, not that of one of the external references.

Regards,
Pablo

--

What most people need to learn in life is how to love people and use
things instead of using people and loving things.

Pablo Montilla
www.odyssey.com.uy

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Brilliant, thanks Kirill that works perfectly.

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Pablo,

this looks like a bug - we've taken the version of the last modification and the last modification was made in the svn:externals branch.
Please watch http://www.jetbrains.net/jira/browse/TW-2228 issue.

Thanks for the report,
KIR

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On Fri, 30 Mar 2007 06:06:33 -0300, Kirill Maximov (JetBrains)
<no_reply@jetbrains.com> wrote:

Pablo,

>

this looks like a bug - we've taken the version of the last
modification and the last modification was made in the svn:externals
branch.
Please watch http://www.jetbrains.net/jira/browse/TW-2228 issue.

>

Thanks for the report,
KIR

OK, great to know it's going to be fixed. ;)

Regards,
Pablo

--

:death code: n. A routine whose job is to set everything in the
computer -- registers, memory, flags, everything -- to zero, including
that portion of memory where it is running; its last act is to stomp on
its own "store zero" instruction. Death code isn't very useful, but
writing it is an interesting hacking challenge on architectures where
the instruction set makes it possible, such as the PDP-8 (it has also
been done on the DG Nova).

Perhaps the ultimate death code is on the TI 990 series, where all
registers are actually in RAM, and the instruction "store immediate 0"
has the opcode "0". The PC will immediately wrap around core as many
times as it can until a user hits HALT. Any empty memory location is
death code. Worse, the manufacturer recommended use of this instruction
in startup code (which would be in ROM and therefore survive).
-- from The on-line Hacker Jargon File V423

Pablo Montilla
www.odyssey.com.uy

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