Hidden TeamCity Feature: Autofix

We are actively using TeamCity for several weeks now.

From nearly the first day we saw some strange behaviour, which puzzled us at first, but we starting to love it more and more.

What happens is when one of our builds goes red and is not fixed for several days (yes, I must admit sometimes that happens to our builds), out of the blue a change is detected that fixes the build. The change is committed with a username that is only configured in TeamCity and none of our developers use it. We initially thought that was a joke of one of the developers. But investigation revealed that changes are committed form the computer, TeamCity runs on, and no one (except me and our chief system administrator) has access to the server.

Not that I do not like the feature, it can actually come very handy.

I'm curious, is this happening only to us, or are there others who see this behaviour?

What I am really interested in, is the tech part behind. How do you guys do that? The commits range from one-liners to relatively complex code pieces. It does not seem probable they are done without human being participating.

So, down to the purpose of my posting: are there any chances I can volunteer and participate in the feature from the other side fixing other's code?

2 comments

Hello Yad,

This is definetely a bug and we're terribly sorry for your inconvenience.
One of our employee is working on his Master degree thesis and wrote a plugin
that upon some tricky code analysis detects simple bugs and makes fixes for
them. This plugin came into the release and was activated by an accident
and we hoped nobody would notice it. We were wrong however and please accept
out apologies.
But I can assure that this is already fixed (in fact this was done automatically
by this plugin).
The fix will be available in 3.1.1.

Thank you for reporting!

We are actively using TeamCity for several weeks now.

From nearly the first day we saw some strange behaviour, which puzzled
us at first, but we starting to love it more and more.

What happens is when one of our builds goes red and is not fixed for
several days (yes, I must admit sometimes that happens to our builds),
out of the blue a change is detected that fixes the build. The change
is committed with a username that is only configured in TeamCity and
none of our developers use it. We initially thought that was a joke of
one of the developers. But investigation revealed that changes are
committed form the computer, TeamCity runs on, and no one (except me
and our chief system administrator) has access to the server.

Not that I do not like the feature, it can actually come very handy.

I'm curious, is this happening only to us, or are there others who see
this behaviour?

What I am really interested in, is the tech part behind. How do you
guys do that? The commits range from one-liners to relatively complex
code pieces. It does not seem probable they are done without human
being participating.

So, down to the purpose of my posting: are there any chances I can
volunteer and participate in the feature from the other side fixing
other's code?

--
Sergey Anchipolevsky
Software Developer
JetBrains, Inc
http://www.jetbrains.com
"Develop with pleasure!"


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